Click above to watch a 40 second overview
by the Omni Foundation


Peter Fingar gave a speech on BPM and Cognitive Computing
that gave a status of the next generation of AI
and its potential impact on civilization and processes specifically.
 
This wins for the most scary session! -- Jim Sinur, MC for the Event

Kindle edition  here.
You will probably want the printed edition to take with you to meetings with colleagues,
as no one can ignore this current technology tsunami and how it will affect us ALL. 
Print edition here.
   Signed individually by the Author here.

 What They Are Saying About the Book ...

When I first peeked at Peter Fingar’s Cognitive Computing book, I thought “uh-oh, another one of those wild-eyed, extreme projections….” Turns out I was wrong. First of all, this is a remarkable and very up-to-date source book on serious work in cognitive computing. Not only that, but it also does a good job of stretching your imagination without stretching your credulity. Peter has done us all a favor in writing this book. He provides a broad landscape and vivid possibilities, sketched in readily accessible form.
--Vint Cerf, Co-Inventor of the Internet and Chief Internet Evangelist, Google

Peter’s engaging, fast-paced journey highlighting key events, players and resources in the 3rd era of computing heralded by IBM Watson is a must read for anyone wanting to keep up with rise of Cognitive Computing. The book covers the technology, emerging applications and their impact on many industries and communities around the world. It is an engaging read and I finished it one sitting – not too common when you read books about technology. If you want to read, learn and contribute to the rise of the Cognitive Era this book is a perfect place to start. --Sridhar Iyengar, Distinguished Engineer, and Cognitive Solutions Research Leader, IBM T. J. Watson Research Center

I don't know what amazed me more, the scope and depth of Peter's knowledge and research on cognitive computing, or his ability to synthesize it all in 78 pages. In any event, it is well worth the time to read it and discover for yourself.--Lemuel Lasher, Founder of Boehme Eckhart LLC, and Chief Innovation Officer Emeritus, Computer Science Corporation (CSC)

While the "Age of Enlightenment" first freed our minds from the slavery of superstition, the Age of Machine Cognition will once again transform our most basic perception of the world and challenge our notion of what it means to be human. Read this book before the machines do. --Dr. Joseph J. Salvo, Founder of the Industrial Internet Consortium and Director, GE Global Research

For more than two decades, Peter Fingar has articulated what matters most, before others see it, and within a window where his advice offers the greatest reward. As one of the founding fathers of BPM, and after identifying the impact of cloud computing years before anyone else, he now explains the most important technology trend of our lifetime, cognitive computing and its impact on business operations. --Nathaniel Palmer,  Editor-in-Chief, BPM.com and Executive Director, Workflow Management Coalition

Peter Fingar has a history of advancing bellwether ideas about technology. He's onto something extremely important in cognitive technology; I am confident it will reshape knowledge work as we know it. --Thomas H. Davenport, Distinguished Professor, Babson College, Author of Competing on Analytics and Big Data @ Work, Digital Fellow, MIT Center for Digital Business

Cognitive Computing changes how we view the future of business and the role of AI. The concepts in this book open up an entirely new dimension when we think about how we architect and transform businesses on a scale many of us have not even fathomed.”
--William Ulrich, President, Business Architecture Guild

This book gives the reader great insight into how “intelligence” will change our lives on a global scale. --Forrest Lin, Chinese Institute of Electronics, Chinese Big Data Expert Committee, Beijing.

Peter Fingar's latest, Cognitive Computing, draws on ideas from diverse online sources, poking relentlessly into both the promise and the peril of smart machines. Cognition as a Service (CaaS) has the potential to augment and scale human expertise, harnessing the power of big data, and providing cognitive assistants for all occupations in smart service systems.
--Dr. Jim Spohrer, Director, Cognitive Systems Institute.

Cognitive Computing takes us on a whirlwind tour of the near-future, a future filled with opportunities and risks -- you need a road map and guide -- this jam-packed book is it.
--Glenn Edens, Vice President - Xerox PARC (Palo Alto Research Center)

Peter has given us a broad overview of what cognitive computing is, what it is capable of and why it is extremely important. It is an excellent starting point for educating yourself on cognitive computing systems that are evolving into something we know not what, other than they can be useful servants or ferocious competitors.--Jim Stikeleather, Chief Innovation Officer, Dell Services

As the world continues to change rapidly, authors who can give us clear descriptions of the changes are needed. Peter Fingar is such an author. His latest book is required reading for all people who wish to quickly overview the paradigm and some of the details of cognitive computing.
--Dr. Thomas Greene, Research Staff Emeritus, MIT-Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL)

Fingar has made the complex topic of cognitive computing easy to understand while demonstrating its power to transform the way we all work and live. This book should be required reading not just for CIOs and CEOs, but anybody who’s remotely interested in getting a glimpse into the not-so-distant future as cognitive computing becomes the foundation for improving every aspect of our lives – from healthcare, to travel to shopping – and that’s only the beginning. --Manoj Saxena, Managing Director, The Entrepreneurs’ Fund, and former General Manager, IBM Watson.

This is the book that Carnegie Mellon Prof. Herbert Simon might well have written, were he alive today. However, Peter’s style is more readable. --Dr. Richard Welke, Professor, Georgia State University; Director, Center for Process Innovation

Peter Fingar is one of those rare technology seers who is also comfortable in the murky world of enterprise IT and business processes. Cognitive computing will have a massive impact on man-machine interactions in every profession and every analytical scenario. Fingar demystifies the buzzword and makes it actionable for every business executive. --Vinnie Mirchandani, Fmr. Director, PWC; V.P., Gartner and author of The New Polymath and SAP Nation

Peter Fingar has written an eye-opening survey from the frontier of cognition as a service. AI networks are learning faster than humans and becoming empathic and wise. Intelligence and emotion will be on tap from smart clouds. Will Cogs be friend or foe? Cognitive Computing is the ultimate game changer. Super intelligent, empathic, wise networks are beginning to provide outboard thinking on tap. (They will probably steal your job). Fingar describes the mind-boggling field of cognitive computing in layman’s terms. It’s further out there than science fiction-- but it’s now science fact!
--Jay Cross,  Berkeley’s  Internet Time Alliance

More than thirty years ago I built expert systems that duplicated -- and even improved on -- expert knowledge in fraud detection and device repair.  The “AI winter” put that era to sleep for a while, but the advent of cheap computing, cheap networking and cheap data analysis has brought it back with a vengeance.  As you will learn in Peter’s book, the combination of millions of sensors on devices (the so-called “Internet of Things”) and the resurgence of artificial intelligence, now under the moniker of “cognitive computing,” means a huge new opportunity -- an opportunity that will create new business models, and crush old ones.
--Dr. Richard Soley, MIT PhD, and CEO, Object Management Group (OMG)

This is the book that Carnegie Mellon professor, Herbert Simon, might well have written, were he alive today. However, Peter’s style is more readable. --Dr. Richard Welke, Professor, Georgia State University; Director, Center for Process Innovation

This book offers a thorough and rich introduction to an evolution that will undoubtedly have a tremendous impact on everyone’s life. A highly compelling read!
--Hendrik Deckers, Founder, CIONET, Belgium

Peter Fingar is one of those rare technology seers who is also comfortable in the murky world of enterprise IT and business processes. Cognitive computing will have a massive impact on man-machine interactions in every profession and every analytical scenario. Fingar demystifies the buzzword and makes it actionable for every business executive. --Vinnie Mirchandani, Fmr. Director, PWC; V.P., Gartner and author of The New Polymath and SAP Nation

Developments in artificial intelligence and robotics should not only be of interest to academics and lovers of science-fiction; these technologies are already changing society. Cognitive Computing is a timely wake-up call addressed at policy makers and business leaders to respond. Fingar not only provides an overview of technological developments but also offers concrete social policy measures – something which is often ignored in these kinds of discussions. --Prof. Mark Coeckelbergh, Computing and Social Responsibility, De Montfort University, UK, and co-Chair of the IEEE Robotics & Automation Society Technical Committee on Robot Ethics

We all know how the Internet changed the world by connecting us all. But now something bigger is happening as you will learn in Peter’s brief, game-changing book, Cognitive Computing. Oh my  goodness, welcome to the era of global, digital intelligence far beyond what we can now imagine. --Marilyn Babb, Business Technology Researcher

 

Foreword by Vint Cerf

When I was asked to write a foreword to Peter Fingar’s Cognitive Computing book, I thought “uh-oh, another one of those wild-eyed, extreme projections….” Turns out I was wrong. First of all, this is a remarkable and very up-to-date source book on serious work in cognitive computing. Not only that, but it also does a good job of stretching your imagination without stretching your credulity. The notion of Cognition as a Service (CAAS) is a good example as it is rooted in the cloud computing capacity of today but draws one’s imagination toward the neuromorphic chips that are emerging now, such as IBM’s TrueNorth. There is a very good, high level exploration of non-Von Neumann architectures including quantum computing which is still in an immature state.

I was particularly struck by Fingar’s observations about learning and its temporal as well as topological nature. This adds a major dimension to models of neurological processing that I had not considered before. The sequence and timing of axonal firings in addition to the topology of synapses suggests that the encoding of memory may be much richer than I had imagined.

Fingar gets into human/robot interaction in a social setting with Pepper the robot, making me think of the 2012 movie, Robot and Frank, as well as Sherry Turkle’s book, Alone Together. Like Sherry, I worry that we will give far too much credibility to the social intelligence of humaniform robots, and be disappointed when they seem unresponsive, thinking that they have rejected us.

Chapter 1 is a kind of zoo tour in the sense that Fingar covers a great deal of computing territory, citing many efforts aimed at cognitive computing. He includes QR codes and tiny URL links for ease of referencing more detailed information (a nice touch). Chapter 2 is even more thought-provoking because it is in this section that Fingar analyzes who will be affected by cognitive computing and how. He reveals many collaborations and partnerships including medical diagnosis using IBM’s Watson computer made famous by its appearance on the Jeopardy television show.

The scariest paragraph in the whole book is found here: “Russia has given rifles to true automatons, which can slaughter at their own discretion. Sentry robots saddled with heavy artillery now patrol ballistic-missile bases, searching for people in the wrong place at the wrong time. Samsung, meanwhile, has lined the Korean DMZ with SGR-A1s, unmanned robots that can shoot to shreds any North Korean spy, in a fraction of a second.”           

I think my favorite gadget, though, is a wrist watch that can make measurements of physical indicators of emotions and place calls for help if the wearer appears to be agitated. Finally, my favorite neologism is “cog” as a short form term for  a cognitive robot. Oh, and by the way, I think the term “robot” can apply to just a piece of software and is not confined to cyber-physical systems. A program that measures stock market behavior and manipulates prices by fast transactions is as much a robot as Asimov’s R. Daneel Olivaw, as I see it.

Peter Fingar has done us all a favor in writing this book. He provides a broad landscape and vivid possibilities, sketched in readily accessible form.

 —Vint Cerf

Chief Internet Evangelist, Google; President of the Association of Computing Machinery;
Co-Founder of the Internet Society; and Co-Inventor of the Internet

 


Cognitive Computing Resource Links Coming Soon